Bright Books Book Club 5th July 2016

We will be discussing The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins.

There will be a Survey Monkey survey circulated (I know you’re all going to vote on Friday night though so you can all make your choices with a glass of wine or similar tipple!) so that you can vote anonymously, but I thought I’d show below what the books are about.
These details are taken from the Waterstones’ site.

Rules of the Survey!

1. Any books that don’t get chosen in the month they are up for selection will not be included in further surveys, but should be taken as a suggested reading list for your own personal ‘out of bookclub’ reading. If you want me to get you a copy of any past month’s books that weren’t selected let me know.
2. In the event of a tie for first place, one of the first place books will be chosen for this month, one for next month.

And now for the books!

1. The Bones of You – Debbie Howells

The Bones of You is a gripping psychological thriller from author Debbie Howells; a story of full of dark secrets, obsession and suspense. I have a gardener’s inherent belief in the natural order of things. Soft-petalled flowers that go to seed. The resolute passage of the seasons. Swallows that fly thousands of miles to follow the eternal summer. Children who don’t die before their parents. A community in shock When eighteen-year-old Rosie Anderson disappears, the idyllic village where she lived will never be the same again. Local gardener Kate is struck with guilt. She’d come to know Rosie well, and thought she understood her – perhaps better even than Rosie’s own mother. A family torn apart Rosie was beautiful, kind and gentle. She came from a loving family and she had her whole life ahead of her. Who could possibly want to harm her? And why? A keeper of secrets Kate is convinced the police are missing something. She’s certain that someone in the village knows more than they’re letting on. As the investigation deepens, so does Kate’s obsession with solving the mystery of what happened to Rosie.

2. The Loney – Andrew Hurley

‘Modern classics in this genre are rare, and instant ones even rarer; The Loney, however, looks as though it may be both’ Sunday Telegraph If it had another name, I never knew, but the locals called it the Loney – that strange nowhere between the Wyre and the Lune where Hanny and I went every Easter time with Mummer, Farther, Mr and Mrs Belderboss and Father Wilfred, the parish priest. It was impossible to truly know the place. It changed with each influx and retreat, and the neap tides would reveal the skeletons of those who thought they could escape its insidious currents. No one ever went near the water. No one apart from us, that is. I suppose I always knew that what happened there wouldn’t stay hidden for ever, no matter how much I wanted it to. No matter how hard I tried to forget …

3. Station Eleven – Emily St John Mandel

The New York Times Bestseller Longlisted for the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction 2015 Shortlisted for the Arthur C. Clarke Award 2015 2014 National Book Awards Finalist 2015 PEN/Faulkner Award Finalist What was lost in the collapse: almost everything, almost everyone, but there is still such beauty. One snowy night in Toronto famous actor Arthur Leander dies on stage whilst performing the role of a lifetime. That same evening a deadly virus touches down in North America. The world will never be the same again. Twenty years later Kirsten, an actress in the Travelling Symphony, performs Shakespeare in the settlements that have grown up since the collapse. But then her newly hopeful world is threatened. If civilization was lost, what would you preserve? And how far would you go to protect it? ‘BEST NOVEL. The big one …One of the 2014 books that I did read stands above all the others: Station Eleven, by Emily St. John Mandel …beautifully written, and wonderfully elegiac, a book that I will long remember, and return to.’ George R.R. Martin, author of Game of Thrones ‘Emily St. John Mandel’s Station Eleven is that rare find that feels familiar and extraordinary at the same time. This is truly something special’ Erin Morgenstern, author of The Night Circus

4. All the Light We Cannot See – Antony Doerr

WINNER OF THE 2015 PULITZER PRIZE FOR FICTION NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER WINNER OF THE CARNEGIE MEDAL FOR FICTION A beautiful, stunningly ambitious novel about a blind French girl and a German boy whose paths collide in occupied France as both try to survive the devastation of World War II Open your eyes and see what you can with them before they close forever.’ For Marie-Laure, blind since the age of six, the world is full of mazes. The miniature of a Paris neighbourhood, made by her father to teach her the way home. The microscopic layers within the invaluable diamond that her father guards in the Museum of Natural History. The walled city by the sea, where father and daughter take refuge when the Nazis invade Paris. And a future which draws her ever closer to Werner, a German orphan, destined to labour in the mines until a broken radio fills his life with possibility and brings him to the notice of the Hitler Youth. In this magnificent, deeply moving novel, the stories of Marie-Laure and Werner illuminate the ways, against all odds, people try to be good to one another.

5. Me Before You – Jojo Moyes

‘Poignant …heartfelt …Me Before You, at it’s heart, is about two people who properly listen to each other; it is something good’ – The Independent on Sunday ‘A compelling novel of life and death decisions and unlikely affections. It’s magical and heartbreaking, but doesn’t shy away from difficult emotional realities. Waterproof mascara essential’ – Marie Claire ‘When I finished this novel, I didn’t want to review it: I wanted to reread it …An affair to remember’ – Liesl Schillinger, The New York Times Book Review ‘This truly beautiful story made us laugh, smile and sob like a baby – you simply have to read it ‘ Closer ‘Destined to be the novel that friends press upon each other more than any other next year, it is a tremendous example of what commercial fiction can do when in the hands of an expert. Moyes does a majestic job of conjuring a cast of characters who are charismatic, credible and utterly compelling; Lou and Will are a couple who readers will take to their hearts as they did One Day’s Emma and Dex’ – The Independent ‘Funny, believable and heartbreaking, this is sure to be the weepy of 2012’ – Woman’s Own ‘Poignant and beautifully written, this book will stay with you long after you’ve put it down’ – Star Magazine ‘Funny, surprising and heartbreaking, populated with characters who are affecting and amusing …This is a thought-provoking, thoroughly entertaining novel that captures the complexity of love’ – People ‘Another powerful love story. A deftly plotted narrative populated with likeable engaging characters …a bittersweet story about love, learning and letting go. It’s a tremendous read and I loved it’ – Daily Mail ‘Keep the tissues close as Jojo Moyes returns with Me Before You, a heartbreaking yet ultimately uplifting tale about the relationship between an embittered quadriplegic man and the carer who is trying to give him a reason to live’ – Good Housekeeping ‘An unlikely love story …To be devoured like candy, between tears’ – O, The Oprah Magazine ‘At last, a new Moyes novel – and it’s a triumph. Her story of love blossoming in the most unlikely of ways packs such an emotional punch, you’ll need a box of tissues’ – Elle ‘Jojo Moyes’s poignantly romantic tales have readers streaming their way through boxes of Kleenex …Me Before You is compelling reading…a profound, fundamental, thought-provoking conundrum lies at the heart of the story, a huge moral dilemma, explored with great fictional finesse. Devotees of Jojo Moyes and newcomers alike will settle into this entertaining book with gusto’ – Sunday Express ‘Romantic, thought-provoking tear-jerker than you won’t be able to put down’ – Woman & H

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